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Shida Night Market - My Last Evening in Taipei

I had the great idea to spend my last evening in Taipei at the so-called Shida Night Market, where I had spent my first evening in Taiwan with my ex-girlfriend. After some time, I became really melancholic, so I decided to go somewhere else. But first I took a short video to show you how the night market looks like. I started to make these videos because of what a Hong Kong friend told me a few months ago.
"When I was in Europe," she said, "I used to feel lonely sometimes. Especially when I saw something really cool and I wanted to show it to my friends. It's not enough to take pictures. I wished I could have just let my friends see those things through my eyes."
I thought about her words and realized that the best way to let others get a feeling of the things I see is to make videos, although my phone is really awful for this purpose.

Shida Night Market (師大夜市, pinyin: shī dà yèshì) is the popular name of a street market close to Shida Road (師大路), which itself takes its name from the nearby National Taiwan Normal University (台灣師範大學, pinyin: táiwān shīfàn dàxué, often simply called 師大, pinyin: shī dà). Shida Night Market is a cluster of alleys and lanes full of shops, restaurants, cafes, and boutiques, most of which open at daytime. But in the evening they are joined by small street restaurants and food stands that sell typical Taiwan food.

Here are some pictures I took in the afternoon, and at the end of the post you will see the video:



















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Comments

  1. Hey dude u bring up memories i have for shida night market and chillin with my girl there. I used to live there for few months and went to shida market almost every day. It was also my first and last day in taiwan.

    And yea man i also went to taiwan from europe to fallow girl as u. In begining it was dream story but ye am slowly gettin reality check. As u said is not west.... u know what i mean

    take care and love from me

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  2. Your friend is right on the money when she says,

    "I used to feel lonely sometimes. Especially when I saw something really cool and I wanted to show it to my friends. It's not enough to take pictures. I wished I could have just let my friends see those things through my eyes."

    And she is so completely right. But it's not just that, it's also being able to express to friends the ups and the downs. When I chat online to people it's always about the positives and all the wonderful things about Taiwan. But there are real negatives to living in a country where you know few people and don't speak the language, and loneliness is definitely the front runner.

    Great blog though, much love.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thanks mate for the upload on the Shida Night Market. I was a student at the MTC (NTNU) just opposite the night market, 10 years ago. I was searching for any online courses offered by the MTC; and came across this site. It brings back the old memory of roaming around the night market tasting all different Chinese cuisine; but that time the place was always overcrowded. Just remember i woke up in the middle of the night with an empty stomach and i have to run the night market for those fried chicken and squid..

    Xiexie and zaijian from the Fiji Islands.

    ReplyDelete
  4. @david: Thank you so much: ) Yes, sometimes the cultural difference can be quite difficult to bridge. But one must learn new lessons in life, sometimes in the easy, and sometimes in the tough way. Greetings from me, too!

    @Stacey: Thanks for your comment!: ) Indeed, people often concentrate on the positive sides, which is certainly right to a certain extent. But I think I'm not the only foreigner who feels lonely at times. Given that here everyone is nice at the beginning, I had perhaps too high expectations. May I ask you if you have lived in Taiwan before? Cheers: )

    @Anonymous: Haha, yes, that's one of the advantages of having a night market nearby. I remember that when I lived in Germany I once went back home from a 15-day trip, and since it was Saturday night, I had nothing to eat and nowhere to go to buy food. I was really starving and went to bed not to feel hunger! This will never happen in Taiwan: ) And nice to know that you have good memories here.

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