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Jumbo Floating Restaurant in Hong Kong

Yesterday I went with my language partner to the Jumbo Floating Restaurant, part of the so-called Jumbo Kingdom, in Aberdeen Harbour. 




The floating restaurant is a gigantic boat built in the style of a Chinese imperial palace, with the addition of modern elements. It offers Cantonese food and, most importantly, yum cha. Yum cha (simplified Chinese: 饮茶; traditional Chinese: 飲茶), literally means 'drink tea'. The name is deceptive, because yum cha actually refers to a Chinese-style lunch or early afternoon meal served with tea. The meals consists of dim sum, a word that comprises a wide range of small dishes: steamed buns, dumplings, siu mai, rice noodle rolls, vegetables, roasted meats, congee porridge, soups etc. 

Usually, the dishes are put on carts, and then waiters push them around the restaurant. When a customer wants something, he calls the waiter and takes one of the baskets or boxes from the cart.

Unfortunately, I and my language partner were very late, because the yum cha ends at 3 pm. But what we ate was basically very similar.

It was a really sunny and hot day; hard to believe that it's already October! Aberdeen Harbour was once a fishermen village. Little is left from those days, and now the whole harbour is surrounded by gigantic buildings. Some people may find them ugly or boring, but I love the impressive view of the sea, the skyscrapers, the boats, and the mountains in the background. 






Compared with other yum cha restaurants, the food in the Jumbo Kingdom is more expensive. But it's delicious, and this restaurant is certainly something unique that's worth visiting. 

Unfortunately, I can't post many pictures on blogger due to visualisation problems. If you want to see more, visit my Facebook page


How To Get To The Jumbo Kingdom


We first went to Exchange Square, and then took the bus number 70. The last stop of the bus is Aberdeen. From the bus stop you follow the indications and in a few minutes you will reach Aberdeen Promenade, which is basically the waterfront. However, to reach the restaurant you need to take a free shuttle boat.


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