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Triad Involvement in Anti-Occupy Central Clashes Confirmed

After anti-Occupy groups attacked pro-democracy protesters on Friday and Saturday, injuring several demonstrators, many wondered whether these assaults, which appeared well-organised and planned in advance, were the work of triad members. Yesterday at a press conference the Secretary for Security of Hong Kong Lai Tung-kwok (黎棟國) confirmed that triad members were involved in the clashes. 

Kwok said that the government severely condemns the violent behaviour of some individuals, and confirmed that the police had arrested 19 suspects, 8 of whom have triad links. They allegedly assaulted demonstrators during clashes in Mong Kok, a popular shopping district. According to the 'China Times', some of the thugs may have been taxi or minibus drivers with triad affiliation. 

The presence of criminal syndicates in Hong Kong's minibus service is notorious (see Yiu Kong Chu: Triads as Business, 2000, pp. 56-61). Some drivers may have been easy to mobilise against Occupy Central. Since pro-democracy demonstrations have paralyzed the traffic, the drivers' most lucrative business in the busiest areas of the city has been disrupted. 


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