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UPDATES: Is Beijing Using Thugs to Intimidate Occupy Central Demonstrators?

Clashes have erupted between Occupy Central demonstrators and pro-Beijing groups. A woman speaking Mandarin was seen giving orders to men who attacked protesters. Are pro-Communist forces in Hong Kong using thugs to scare Occupy Central supporters?


This is difficult to say and impossible to prove (that's where the cleverness of this strategy lies). However, it can be proved that Beijing has been using this kind of tactics in Taiwan, where the so-called 'White Wolf', a former leader of a criminal syndicate, meddled in this year's Sunflower Movement protests to intimidate opponents of China-Taiwan reunification.

The use of thugs is a mafia-like strategy that allows the CCP not to be directly and openly involved in actions against its opponents. While sending the army would compromise the image of the party and the state, thugs act 'on their own', and nobody can prove that someone is behind them. However, since no one can prove it, I can only say that the connection between Beijing and today's clashes is a 'hypothesis', and nothing more.  

Meanwhile, pro-Beijing and anti-Occupy protests have been launched. It appears that also some frustrated shop owners and citizens annoyed by the disruption of traffic and business are growing increasingly frustrated with the Occupy movement. A pro-Beijing protester today told a foreigner: "Go back to your country". The typical phrase intolerant people use when they have no arguments.  

In Singapore, the police questioned several Hong Kongers who took part in a solidarity rally for Occupy Central. Singapore's authoritarian government is widely known for its suppression of freedom of speech and its practice of censorship.  

A group of mainland students has set up a Facebook page to show their support for Occupy Central. 


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