Skip to main content

Hong Kong Government Censors the Word "National" in Names of Taiwanese Universities

Despite Beijing's pledge that Hong Kong's system would remain unchanged after 1997, the institutions of Hong Kong are little by little aligning themselves with the national ideology of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP). 

According to local reportsthe theatrical troupe The Nonsensemakers (糊塗戲班) was invited by Hong Kong's Leisure and Cultural Services Department to take part in an event in late March. However, the department asked that the name of the alma mater of one of the troupe's members, National Taipei University of the Arts, had to be changed and the word "National" had to be removed. 

In a statement published on their Facebook page, The Nonsensemakers explained:

The Nonsensemakers were invited by the Leisure and Cultural Department to perform the piece "Three Novels: The Third Lie" from 18 to 20 March at the Tsuen Wan Town Hall. Because the Department was the organiser of the event, it was its responsibility to print out the booklets. The organisers asked for the bio of each troupe member. Our director and executive producer, Luo Shuyan, graduated from National Taipei University of the Arts (國立台北藝術大學), but the Leisure and Cultural Department said that the word "National" could not appear on the booklets and asked that it be removed. They did not even allow the English version of the name to be published. Although we fought for it, in the end we could not change their decision and we suggested the abbreviation Beiyida (北藝大). The name of one's alma mater is a basic fact, and printing the entire name on the booklets is an act of respect for learning and art. That's why we would rather remove all the information and refuse to have our curricula censored. We have no alternative. We sincerely hope that Hong Kong may continue to enjoy freedom of speech and of creative work. That is our most cherished core value. 

On March 22 Secretary for Home Affairs Lau Kong-wah read out a statement from the government at a press conference in response to the controversy. “Hong Kong has been maintaining very close and active relations with other parts of the world, especially in cultural exchanges,” Lau was quoted as saying. “The co-operation is good, is fruitful and we welcome these cultural exchanges and will continue our efforts.” Lau did not accept reporters' questions. 

On March 23 another name controversy hit the headlines after the Chinese University of Hong Kong unilaterally decided to expunge from its website the word "National" referred to National Taiwan University and other institutions of the island. 

On Thursday Taiwan's Minister of Education Wu Sihua (吳思華) said that he hoped both sides would respect each other and maintain cultural and educational exchanges on an equal level. He added that educational institutions should remain free from political interference. Wu stated that he had already asked the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in Hong Kong, which serves as an unofficial embassy, to notify the Hong Kong government about the standpoint of the Taiwanese Ministry of Education. 

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Will The Huawei Case Finally Awaken Democrats To The China Threat And The Danger Of Faux Free Trade Rhetoric?

On January 28 the Department of Justice of the United States unsealed two cases against Huawei, China's largest telecommunications company, and its chief financial officer, Meng Wanzhou. 
Huawei has been accused of trying to steal trade secrets, committing bank fraud, breaking confidentiality agreements and violating sanctions against Iran. One indictment claims that Huawei attempted to steal trade secrets from T-Mobile by promising bonuses to employees who collected confidential information.
Huawei is not a company like any other. Over the years it has benefited enormously from the support of the Chinese Communist regime. The founder of Huawei, Ren Zhengfei, joined China's army during the Cultural Revolution. In 1978 he also joined the Chinese Communist Party (CCP). 
In the early years Huawei's sources of capital were high-interest loans (20%-30%) from Chinese state-owned enterprises. Ren also secured soft loans from the local government of Shenzhen thanks to his personal co…

Chinese Dissident Zhang Jilin Detained By Police In Chongqing After Calling On Xi Jinping To Resign

Chinese dissident Zhang Jilin (张吉林) has been detained by police in the city of Chongqing after publicly saying that President Xi Jinping should be removed from office.
According to Taiwan-based Apple Daily, on January 17 Zhang talked about China's current affairs on a WeChat group. His ideas received praise from the group members, and he later told friends that he wanted to give a public speech based on the thoughts he had expressed online.
Other dissidents urged him to be careful, but he insisted that he had "the right to free speech." On January 19 Zhang went to Guanyinqiao Square, in the city of Chongqing, and delivered a speech about China's political situation, calling on Xi Jinping to be removed from office.
"I think it's time for Xi Jinping to be removed from office," Zhang told a crowd according to an audio recording. "The Chinese Communist Party will not do anything to the people. If you don't believe me, look, I have been giving a speech…

China Is Releasing A Cartoon About The Life And Times Of Karl Marx To Popularize Communist Ideology

On Monday Chinese video sharing website Bilibi (哔哩哔哩) will be releasing a cartoon about the life and times of the founder of Communism, Karl Marx. The Publicity Department of the Central Committee of the Chinese Communist Party (CCPPD) and the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences have partnered to create the cartoon, whose aim is to popularize Marxism.
The cartoon, entitled The Leader (领风者), has been realized in a style reminiscent of Japanese anime and consists of 7 episodes of 25 minutes each.  The story focuses on the young Karl Marx' friendship with Friedrich Engels and his relationship with his wife, Jenny von Westphalen. A trailer released in December shows Marx portrayed as a young, handsome and energetic leader. 
The cartoon aims at making Karl Marx more accessible the common Chinese people, who may not be familiar with his theories.
Marx has experienced a revival in China after Xi Jinping took office in 2012 and began emphasizing the importance of Marxist ideology.   
Marxism-L…