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Hong Kong - Walk From Sai Ying Pun To Smithfield Public Library (Kennedy Town)

Yesterday I decided to take a walk from Sai Ying Pun to Smithfield Public Library, a small library in Kennedy Town. 

People who like old architecture will probably not be interested in sightseeing in this modern area. But I love skyscrapers and densely populated cities, so I want to share some pictures with you. 


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Here is one of the very rare examples of an old Hong Kong building. That's how the streets of these Chinese-populated area looked like for decades, until the population increase compelled the government to tear them down and build giant affordable apartment blocks


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And here is one of the typical huge apartment blocks of Hong Kong. The population increase from about 1 million in the 1940s to 6 million in the 1990s left the British government no choice but to build this kind of houses. Check out my article about Hong Kong's housing problem.
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Older buildings with no lifts, with modern residential skyscrapers in the background.


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A street corner with small shops


The new Kennedy Town swimming pool, built after the old swimming pool in Smithfield was demolished to make space for the MTR station


Residential skyscrapers on top of a department store. The Hong Kong MTR Corporation pursues a so-called "rail plus property" model. According to the company's officials website, the MTR is "granted land development rights alongside railway alignments and build integrated communities incorporating residences, offices, shops, schools, kindergartens, green spaces and other public facilities above our stations and depots." That's how the MTR manages to make money without having to rely solely on ticket revenue. And that's why MTR stations are usually giant real estate development projects or offices on top of shopping malls.  





This is the second of only two old buildings I encountered during my walk.



A verdant hill next to the old building.










Older and newer post-war residential buildings



Smithfield Public Library inside the Smithfield Municipal Services Building



Next to the library is a food market



Huge apartment blocks


One exit of Kennedy Town MTR station









Kennedy Town Station, the last station on the Western side of the Hong Kong Island line


There are many small traditional restaurants and food stalls near the station. 


I hope you liked these pictures. If you want to support my work, please share this post and check out one of my books on Amazon. Thank you! 

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