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A New Life, A New Blog - From Asia To Europe

File:Spanish steps Rome Italy.jpg
Spanish steps, Rome (By 2pi.pl, via Wikimedia Commons)


In 2012 I started 'My New Life In Asia' as a personal blog revolving around my every day experiences in Taiwan. During the first two years of this blog's existence, I published hundreds of articles - some personal, others about culture and history - and I found that blogging is a wonderful way of systematizing the process of understanding a foreign country, of sharing thoughts with people from all over the world. 

In 2014, however, I gradually lost my commitment to blogging. My father got ill and almost a year later he passed away. Recently, my mother was diagnosed with breast cancer. Worries, anxiety and stress have made made it impossible for me to blog the way I used to. 

Between 2012 and early 2014 I was curious and carefree. I loved to read books about Taiwan and East Asia, combine that knowledge with my personal experiences, and then provide on this blog my own perspective and analysis. Since my father passed away, however, I haven't been as carefree as in the past. That had an impact on my ability to blog regularly, and to create content in a relaxed mood.

When I learnt that my mother had breast cancer, I did not hesitate for a moment. I realized that my Asian adventure, that my life in Taiwan and Hong Kong, was over. She needs me. I can no longer just think about myself, I have to be there for her. So I decided to return to Europe and settle down somewhere close to her. 

Nevertheless, I never lost my passion for blogging. I can no longer write primarily about Asia. First of all because I don't live there any more. Secondly, because Asia itself is changing. With the rise of Xi Jinping, China - including Hong Kong and Macau - has become less liberal. From an intellectual point of view, China is once again isolating itself. The Communist Party's grip on society is tightening. News coming from China is becoming less interesting. Talking to people freely more difficult. Although I used to write a lot about Taiwan and Hong Kong, China was one of the main topics of this blog. 



I will continue to write about China, Hong Kong and Taiwan. This will probably remain my main focus. But I will also write more about Europe and other parts of the world. As I am currently living in Rome, it might be interesting to share my thoughts and some information about the city's history, architecture and politics. Unfortunately, I will lose the niche in which I felt so comfortable. But as life changes, we all need to adapt to new circumstances and challenges. 

I would like to thank the almost one million people from every corner of the world who have visited my blog over the course of the last few years. And I hope that old readers as well as new ones may be interested in what I will be writing in the future.   

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