Skip to main content

Poland Wants To Take In More Immigrant Labour From The Philippines - Because Of Their Catholic Faith

Poland is considering taking in more immigrant labour. The ruling right-wing Law and Justice party, however, wants to open up the country only to Christian workers. 

Poland is one of Europe's most anti-immigrant countries. A survey released last December by the Polish Centre for Public Opinion Research (CBOS) showed that 63% of respondents did not want to receive refugees, while only 33% were in favour. The Polish government has refused to accept any refugees under the quota system set by the European Commission. The anti-immigration sentiment of the majority of the Polish population is directed mostly against Muslims. 

Embed from Getty Images

Although it refuses to take in refugees, Poland suffers from a severe labour shortage and is in desperate need of foreign workers to sustain economic development. According to a survey conducted in January by Work Service SA, half of Polish companies cannot fill vacancies, and almost two-thirds of public-sector employers are seeking new employees. 

Over the past few years around 1.5 million people from Ukraine have moved to Poland. They have relieved labour market shortages, but last year domestic vacancies surged nearly 40 percent. 

In December 2017 incoming Polish Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki said that his dream was to "re-Christianize the EU." A few days later he told Radio Poland that his government would "not be receiving migrants from the Middle East and Northern Africa". 


As a result, the far-right Polish government, in an attempt to safeguard what it perceives as the country's identity, has turned to the Philippines to ease labour shortage. 

More than 86 percent of the population of the Philippines are Roman Catholic, while 8 percent belong to other Christian confessions. The country also has a small Muslim minority, amounting to 4 percent of the population, most of whom live on the southern islands of Mindanao, Sulu, and Palawan. 

On July 28 Stanislaw Szwed, Secretary of State of the Ministry of Family, Labour and Social Policy, told news agency PAP that Warsaw is negotiating an agreement with the Philippines which would allow Filipino citizens to work in Poland. 

He referred to the "cultural closeness" of the two nations, especially due to their common "Catholic confession", as the reason why the Polish government welcomes Filipino workers. 

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Will The Huawei Case Finally Awaken Democrats To The China Threat And The Danger Of Faux Free Trade Rhetoric?

Huawei Shenzhen office building (by Raysonho  via Wikimedia Commons) On January 28 the Department of Justice of the United States unsealed two cases against Huawei , China's largest telecommunications company, and its chief financial officer, Meng Wanzhou.  Huawei has been accused of trying to steal trade secrets, committing bank fraud, breaking confidentiality agreements and violating sanctions against Iran. One indictment claims that Huawei attempted to steal trade secrets from T-Mobile by promising bonuses to employees who collected confidential information. Huawei is not a company like any other. Over the years it has benefited enormously from the support of the Chinese Communist regime. The founder of Huawei, Ren Zhengfei, joined China's army during the Cultural Revolution . In 1978 he also joined the Chinese Communist Party (CCP).  In the early years Huawei's sources of capital were high-interest loans (20%-30%) from Chinese state-owned enterp

How the Chinese Communist Party uses "Chinese culture" as an excuse to justify its crimes

Shanghai, Nanjing Road (photo by Agnieszka Bojczuk via Wikimedia Commons ) Since its founding in 1921 the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) has mastered the art of propaganda and recruitment of individuals both inside and outside the country who are willing to cooperate with it and further its interests - a practice known as "united front work". "United front work" refers to the CCP's strategy of cooptation of groups or individuals that are not members of the CCP but are willing to cooperate with it. Cooptation describes the process of bringing outsiders (usually the resource-poorer) inside (usually the resource-richer) ( Saward , 1992). An example of this strategy is the case of former Hong Kong's Chief Executive Tung Chee-hwa. Prior to the 1997 handover of Hong Kong from Britain to the People's Republic of China (PRC), Tung Chee-hwa had close ties with the government of Taiwan. However, after his shipping company ran into financial trouble and

Washington Post correspondent in China Gerry Shih assaulted for walking with Caucasian European

Gerry Shih, a China-based correspondent for the Washington Post, was assaulted on a Beijing street for "walking with a Caucasian European," according to a Tweet he posted on November 29. The assailants allegedly shouted at them: "F*** your American embassy!" Sign of the times: roughed up in Beijing street tonight for walking with Caucasian European. Neither of us said we were American but their parting shot was “操你美国使馆” pic.twitter.com/ekPLNsLBnj — Gerry Shih (@gerryshih) November 29, 2019 In recent years the Chinese Communist regime has intensified its anti-foreign rhetoric as Xi Jinping has sought to consolidate the power of the Party and rid China of perceived "foreign influence". Foreigners in China have been targeted by the government and anti-foreign sentiment has been enouraged. This year arrests and deportations of foreign teachers in China have increased amid a government campaign to promote "patriotic education." An inc