Skip to main content

Chinese Websites Sell Fake Hong Kong University Diplomas Even Experts Cannot Detect

Hong Kong University (by Adon3465 via Wikimedia Commons)

Chinese websites sell fake diplomas of major Hong Kong universities that even experts cannot recognize as forgeries.

According to Hong Kong-based newspaper HK01, there are a large number of websites in mainland China that sell fake diplomas of Hong Kong's eight major universities.

An HK01 reporter asked Chong Yiu Kwong (莊耀洸), a Solicitor and Teaching Fellow at the Hong Kong Institute of Education, and Alexa Chow (周綺萍), a Human Resources Consultant, to examine two diplomas. One was a fake 2017 bachelor's degree in business administration from Hong Kong University (HKU), which the journalist had purchased from a Chinese website for 1,200 RMB. The other one was a real 2014 diploma from HKU.

Both Chong Yiu Kwong, who is also a HKU alumnus, and Alexa Chow mistook the fake one for authentic. Ms. Chow explained that there are is no standard for how diplomas should look like. Their layout, colour, size and paper quality may vary depending on the university and the year they were issued. Mr. Chow stated that the only way for employers to make sure job applicants provide authentic credentials is to contact universities to verify whether diplomas are genuine. Both Mr. Chong and Ms. Chow agreed that the fake diploma seemed to have better quality than the real one.

Under Section 73 of Hong Kong's Crimes Ordinance, "using a false instrument" is an offence liable to imprisonment for 14 years. Hong Kong Police statistics do not list using a false instrument as a separate crime, but include it in the broader category of "deception." In 2017, 7,091 crimes of deception were committed.

Companies selling fake academic credentials are known as diploma mills. According to Ejinsight, diploma mills have a big market in mainland China and Hong Kong because of the crucial role education plays in Chinese societies. In June Chinese state-run People's Daily published a list of 392 diploma mills. 

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Living in Taiwan: Seven Reasons Why It's Good to Be Here

Chinese New Year can be a pretty boring time for a foreigner. All of my friends were celebrating with their families, and since I have no family here, nor have I a girlfriend whose family I could join, I had nothing special to do. Shops and cafes were closed - apart from big chains like McDonald's or Starbucks, which were overcrowded anyway. So I had a lot of time to think.
On Saturday evening I went out to buy my dinner. While I was walking around, I heard the voices of the people inside their homes, the sounds of their New Year celebrations. Then I suddenly asked myself: "What on earth are you doing here? Why are you still in Taiwan?" 
Before I came to Taiwan, some Taiwanese friends of mine had recommended me their country, highly prasing it and going so far as to say that Taiwan is a "paradise for foreigners" (bear in mind that when I say foreigners I mean 'Westerners'). 
"It's easy for foreigners to find a job," they argued. "Taiwane…

7 Reasons Why Hong Kong Is A Great Place To Live

In 2013 I wrote a post about 7 reasons why it's good to live in Taiwan based on my one-year experience in the country. Now I would like to talk about another place which I love, and which I have perhaps loved more than any other: Hong Kong.
When I was growing up in a small town in Southern Italy, I knew very little about Hong Kong. As a child I remember watching the handover ceremony in 1997, yet at that time I did not really understand much about what was going on. That is my first, vague memory of Hong Kong.
Years later, when I was in my early twenties, I watched a short documentary about Hong Kong on Italian television. I was captivated by the energy and modernity of that exotic metropolis. I thought that some day I would like to visit it. However, it was not on my list of priorities. I wanted to go to Japan, mainland China, South Korea, far more than I wished to go to Hong Kong.
In late 2011 I decided to go to Taiwan because of a girl I had met in Germany. While I was there, …

Back To Blogging, Finally

A few months ago I deactivated this blog because I wasn't happy about it. Over the years I had been writing too many posts about news and politics, and I felt that this was no longer the kind of personal blog I wanted to create at the beginning: a place for me to share my thoughts and experiences about my life in Taiwan, Hong Kong and other parts of East Asia.