Skip to main content

Dozens of Mainland Chinese Detained by Police For Supporting Hong Kong's Occupy Central

Since September 28 at least 34 people have been detained and 60 people have been questioned by the police in mainland China for sharing images and news of Hong Kong's Occupy Central or showing support for it. As the "Umbrella Revolution" unfolded in Hong Kong, the Communist government and its media apparatus have been trying to insulate the mainland from the outside world, leading to a sharp increase of censorship activities.

According to Civil Rights and Livelihood Watch (民生观察), the Hunanese activist Ou Biaofeng (欧彪峰) was arrested on October 1. A squad of Zhuzhou Internal Security Bureau broke open the door of his house while he was still in bed. They questioned him about some pictures he had posted online in which he was seen as shaving his head in support of Occupy Central (the initiators of Occupy Central had shaven their heads at the beginning of September to show their "determination to fight for true democracy").

"Because I shaved my whole head clean and put on a black shirt to express support for the struggle of Hong Kong's Occupy Central for genuinely democratic elections," Ou wrote on his Twitter profile on October 1, "at 8 am I was taken into custody by two security officials. Then they drove me more than 20 kilometers away to a rural area outside Zhuzhou. I watched them fishing at a pond. After 4 pm we went back to town, they took me to my house and left.


Wang Long, a 26-year-old activist, was arrested in Shenzhen at the end of September for "picking quarrels and provoking trouble" (which means: for sharing pictures of Occupy Central online).

At around noon of October 4, Zhang Shengyu (張聖雨), an activist from Guangzhou, was walking on the street with two friends, when a car approached them and officers in civilian clothing forced him to get in. The previous day Zhang had held placards in support of Occupy Central at a park in Guangzhou. He was one of at least 4 people who were "kidnapped" in the city by the police for showing solidarity to Hong Kong's democracy movement. 

Shen Yanqiu (沈艷秋) was detained on September 30. She had just come back to Shanghai from Guangzhou. A group of policemen went to the shop she runs and took her into custody. She was detained for an hour and severely warned not to travel to Hong Kong. "They kept asking me why I had shaved my head," she said in a telephone interview, "I said it was within my civil rights to do so. After I left [the police bureau] I shouted that I support Hong Kong democracy movement," she said. "Shaving our heads means that we, too, support righteousness, freedom and love."

The list of people detained by the police in mainland China includes: Huang Minpeng (黄敏鹏), Luo Xiaoxiang (刘小翔), Liu Hui (刘辉), Xie Dan (谢丹), Luo Yaling (罗亚玲), Song Ningsheng (宋宁生), Gong Xinsheng (龚新华), Chen Maosen (陈茂森), Chen Jianfang (陈建芳). 


Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Taipei Walking Tours - A Guide To Taipei In 6 Days

Taiwan is one of the most underrated tourist destinations in Asia. With about 10.74 million tourists in 2017, it lags behind Asian neighbours like Thailand (35 million), Hong Kong (58 million), Japan (28.7 million), or Indonesia (14 million).
Nevertheless, Taiwan is a great place to visit due to its amazing food, fascinating history, traditional Chinese culture, friendly atmosphere, safety, and natural attractions. Moreover, Taiwan has a very convenient visa policy. Citizens of many countries, including the United States and most European Union members, can travel to Taiwan without a visa and stay there for up to 90 days. You can literally buy a plane ticket and go to Taiwan without doing any paperwork.    
If you travel to Taiwan, your first destination will probably be the capital and largest city: Taipei.




Taipei is the political and economic centre of the island, with lots of attractions ranging from modern skyscrapers and shopping centres to night markets, colonial Japanese architect…

Will The Huawei Case Finally Awaken Democrats To The China Threat And The Danger Of Faux Free Trade Rhetoric?

On January 28 the Department of Justice of the United States unsealed two cases against Huawei, China's largest telecommunications company, and its chief financial officer, Meng Wanzhou. 
Huawei has been accused of trying to steal trade secrets, committing bank fraud, breaking confidentiality agreements and violating sanctions against Iran. One indictment claims that Huawei attempted to steal trade secrets from T-Mobile by promising bonuses to employees who collected confidential information.
Huawei is not a company like any other. Over the years it has benefited enormously from the support of the Chinese Communist regime. The founder of Huawei, Ren Zhengfei, joined China's army during the Cultural Revolution. In 1978 he also joined the Chinese Communist Party (CCP). 
In the early years Huawei's sources of capital were high-interest loans (20%-30%) from Chinese state-owned enterprises. Ren also secured soft loans from the local government of Shenzhen thanks to his personal co…

Majority Of Germans Are Afraid Of Donald Trump - Survey

More than two-thirds of Germans think that Donald Trump's foreign policy is making the world more dangerous, according to a recent survey.

The survey shows that 69 percent of respondents worry that Trump's policy is making the world more dangerous, topping this year's list. 

63 percent of respondents said they are worried about asylum seekers, 63% fear "tensions due to the arrival of foreigners", 61 percent worry about politicians' inability to tackle problems. 59 percent are worried about terrorism - 12 percent less than a year ago.

58 percent are worried about the cost of the EU debt crisis to German taxpayers, while 57 percent fear political extremism.

"The Fears of the Germans" (Die Ängste der Deutschen) is a survey conducted every year by R+V-Infocenter since 1992. 2,400 people above 14 years are asked about their biggest worries. This year the survey was conducted between June 8 to July 18.