Skip to main content

'Taiwan Will Not Bow To Pressure,' Taipei Government Says After China Forces Airlines To Drop Taiwan From Websites

The government in Taipei has expressed its determination to stand up to China after 44 airlines bowed to pressure from Beijing and stopped listing Taiwan as a separate country. 

On July 25 Chinese Communist Party (CCP) newspaper People's Daily announced that American Airlines, United, Delta, Hong Kong-based Cathay Pacific as well as forty other airlines had complied with a request filed by the Civil Aviation Administration of China on April 25 to list Taiwan, Hong Kong and Macau as part of Chinese territory.   

Embed from Getty Images

American Airlines spokeswoman Shannon Gilson told the BBC that the company was implementing changes to address China's request. "Air travel is global business, and we abide by the rules in countries where we operate," she stated.

In a written statement Cathay Pacific explained that as an airline registered and based in the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) of the People's Republic of China (PRC) it "must comply with the regulations and requirements of the relevant civil aviation authorities."

The PRC claims that Taiwan is part of its territory, despite never having ruled or controlled it. Taiwan and outlying islands are currently administered by the Republic of China (ROC), the state founded in 1912 in China after the overthrow of the last imperial dynasty. The ROC was defeated by Mao Zedong's Communists in 1949 and its government relocated to Taiwan.  


Lin Ho-ming (林鶴明), a spokesperson for Taiwan's Presidential Office, said that in spite of being "a close neighbour of the world's largest Communist country and subject to its relentless pressure, it holds on to its deep love for freedom and democracy (自由民主的熱愛)."    

He pointed out that Taiwan is an economic powerhouse that is integrated into the global system and is founded upon universal values. "No attempt to change our name on the internet will erase our country from the world," Lin said, adding that "the people of Taiwan will absolutely never bow to pressure, and will never sacrifice their ideal of freedom and the welfare of the next generation."

Lin called on the international community to face squarely "China's increasingly out-of-control behaviour," to defend the values of freedom and democracy, as well as the safety and stability of the international community.  

Comments

Popular posts from this blog

Taipei Walking Tours - A Guide To Taipei In 6 Days

Taiwan is one of the most underrated tourist destinations in Asia. With about 10.74 million tourists in 2017, it lags behind Asian neighbours like Thailand (35 million), Hong Kong (58 million), Japan (28.7 million), or Indonesia (14 million).
Nevertheless, Taiwan is a great place to visit due to its amazing food, fascinating history, traditional Chinese culture, friendly atmosphere, safety, and natural attractions. Moreover, Taiwan has a very convenient visa policy. Citizens of many countries, including the United States and most European Union members, can travel to Taiwan without a visa and stay there for up to 90 days. You can literally buy a plane ticket and go to Taiwan without doing any paperwork.    
If you travel to Taiwan, your first destination will probably be the capital and largest city: Taipei.




Taipei is the political and economic centre of the island, with lots of attractions ranging from modern skyscrapers and shopping centres to night markets, colonial Japanese architect…

Majority Of Germans Are Afraid Of Donald Trump - Survey

More than two-thirds of Germans think that Donald Trump's foreign policy is making the world more dangerous, according to a recent survey.

The survey shows that 69 percent of respondents worry that Trump's policy is making the world more dangerous, topping this year's list. 

63 percent of respondents said they are worried about asylum seekers, 63% fear "tensions due to the arrival of foreigners", 61 percent worry about politicians' inability to tackle problems. 59 percent are worried about terrorism - 12 percent less than a year ago.

58 percent are worried about the cost of the EU debt crisis to German taxpayers, while 57 percent fear political extremism.

"The Fears of the Germans" (Die Ängste der Deutschen) is a survey conducted every year by R+V-Infocenter since 1992. 2,400 people above 14 years are asked about their biggest worries. This year the survey was conducted between June 8 to July 18.

Will The Huawei Case Finally Awaken Democrats To The China Threat And The Danger Of Faux Free Trade Rhetoric?

On January 28 the Department of Justice of the United States unsealed two cases against Huawei, China's largest telecommunications company, and its chief financial officer, Meng Wanzhou. 
Huawei has been accused of trying to steal trade secrets, committing bank fraud, breaking confidentiality agreements and violating sanctions against Iran. One indictment claims that Huawei attempted to steal trade secrets from T-Mobile by promising bonuses to employees who collected confidential information.
Huawei is not a company like any other. Over the years it has benefited enormously from the support of the Chinese Communist regime. The founder of Huawei, Ren Zhengfei, joined China's army during the Cultural Revolution. In 1978 he also joined the Chinese Communist Party (CCP). 
In the early years Huawei's sources of capital were high-interest loans (20%-30%) from Chinese state-owned enterprises. Ren also secured soft loans from the local government of Shenzhen thanks to his personal co…