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Chinese Human Rights Attorney Wang Quanzhang Allowed To Speak To Lawyer After 3 Years In Detention

In August 2015 human rights lawyer Wang Quanzhang was arrested by the Chinese authorities and charged with subversion of state power. Wang's detention was part of a large scale crackdown on human rights lawyers and activists that has become known as the "709 crackdown". The wave of repression that began in July of that year was seen as yet another sign of President Xi Jinping's desire to tighten the Communist Party's grip on society. 

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For three years nothing was heard of Wang Quanzhang, and his family did not know what had happened to him. On April 11 Wang's wife, Li Wenzu, sent out a message saying that she had been placed under house arrest. "Last night I was forcibly returned home by Domestic Security," she wrote. "The people who are monitoring us were already at their posts, about 30 of them downstairs ... They include Domestic Security, Neighborhood Committee, and 'Chaoyang Aunties' [women who get paid by the authorities for patrolling the streets]."


On July 13 Wang was reportedly allowed to see his lawyer, Liu Weiguo. Li Wenzu received a message from a friend informing her that her husband was "in a good state, both physically and mentally,"

According to Hong Kong-based news website HK01, Liu Weiguo was able to see his client twice. Li Wenzu published posts on her Twitter and Facebook profile, saying that her husband suffers from high blood pressure and was taking medicine given to him in detention. 

She stated that Wang had never suffered from high blood pressure before, adding that many of the arrested human rights lawyers had developed similar symptoms while in jail and were made to take medicine. She said that large black spots had appeared on the face of some laywers after their release.

Li said that her husband appeared afraid to talk to his lawyer and at times only moved his lips. She believes that Wang must have been subjected to torture. However, she urged him not to give up and not to plead guilty. 

Comments

  1. This summary sounds a little one-sided. Could we have the charges as stated by the prosecutor and also the connection–if any–between the accused and foreign agents of the US or other countries? Then we can make up our own minds.

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